Biography

Dr. Alperovitz is the Lionel R. Bauman Professor of Political Economy at the University of Maryland, and the co-founder of the Democracy Collaborative, an innovative think tank developing new models for sustainable, equitable, and cooperative community development. He is the author numerous books, including most recently “America Beyond Capitalism” and, with Lew Daly, “Unjust Deserts.” He also oversees the Project on General Disarmament and is one of the founders of the Committee for the Political Economy of the Good Society (PEGS). Dr. Alperovitz also serves as President of the National Center for Economic and Security Alternatives. Previously he was a Fellow of King’s College at Cambridge University, a founding Fellow of the Institute of Politics at Harvard University, a Fellow of the Institute for Policy Studies, and a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution. He has also served as a Legislative Director in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, and as a Special Assistant in the Department of State.

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MH: Michael Shuman GA: Gar Alperovitz On Economic Development MS: Economic development currently counsels communities across the planet to attract and retain global business. Implicitly this assumes that local business is irrelevant. My belief is that prosperity flows from three alternative principles of economic development that prioritize …

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Slowly, quietly, people concerned with achieving a sustainable and equitable society are beginning to get serious about two new challenges. The first involves what is best understood as the next system question. The second has come to be called the new economy movement. Movement forward in both cases is likely to intensify as social, economic, …

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Americans face a unique challenge in solving the climate crisis. Unlike other Western countries and Japan, where population is projected to be relatively constant, the U.S. population is set to grow by at least 100 million—and likely 150 million—people by 2050. Where and under what conditions these people live present serious challenges to …

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The United States—indeed, the global community—is at a crossroads. We have a choice between two futures. The first is business as usual. In an effort to continue economic growth in the conventional sense (growing Gross Domestic Product with little concern for distribution of wealth), we exacerbate all of the problems that GDP growth is …

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