Biography

Susan is an Emerita Professor of Social Work at McMaster University and an Adjunct Professor at the United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Her research is primarily at the intersection of health care and social policy fields, particularly in relation to maternal and newborn health in Canada and globally. Most recently her focus has been on the impact of WaSH policies and practice in LMICs and their impact on maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality. Additionally, she works on issues of interdisciplinary community-based education, research ethics, and gender equity.

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Personal hygiene is the practice of keeping your body clean, including your hands. Hygiene has aesthetic and moral (purity) dimensions in addition to health dimensions.1 Dating back to biblical times and beyond, societies have emphasized the importance of cleanliness of both people and the environment. Dirt was negatively construed, moving …

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Almost 25 years ago, women and men gathered in Dublin, Ireland, for an international conference on water and the environment. The Dublin Statement on Water and Sustainable Development agreed upon at this event was a pivotal document six months before Rio and the Earth Summit.1 The Dublin Statement provided the first official recognition of …

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At a fundamental level, the gendered roles that women have assumed over time—reproductive, productive, and community management—are significantly impacted by lack of water, poor water quality, lack of sanitation, and inadequate hygiene facilities (WaSH).1,2 Almost 25 years ago, through the Dublin Statement,3 women were officially recognized as …

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